FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions

Find our answers to questions that often come to mind when thinking about KLANG products and their integration into your setup. If you cannot find your particular question answered below, please leave us a message through our web messenger. We will get back to you as soon as possible.

3D In-Ear Monitoring

Can I get 3D sound without motion tracking?

Yes. The 3D processing already delivers all spatial cues your brain and ears need to distinguish directions where the sound is coming from. Without KLANG:vektor motion tracking, the mix will be 3D (left, right, in front, behind, above or below you – all sources externalized) but when you turn your head, your mix will stay the same.

If you want sound sources to stay fixed with e.g. the stage or instruments you see on stage, KLANG:vektor enables you to look around in an acoustic virtual reality on stage.

Do I need special headphones or in-ears to experience 3D sound?

No. KLANG incorporates binaural technology and processes the sound inside KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier to work immediately with your own pair of standard stereo headphones or in-ears. In fact, it is not important if your headphones are open or closed, electrostatic, dynamic or use balanced armature drivers as most in-ears do. You can use universal fit in-ears or custom molded in-ears. Just make sure that the polarity is correct and the left and right signals go to the correct ears.

How can I connect the position data of the other musicians?

If you want your mix to follow with the movement of musicians, please talk to us. There are position tracking systems for on-stage use available as e.g. from TiMax. These system allow to send out their position data and KLANG can also deal with these positions. However, this is not the normal use case and we will help you to figure out the best configuration for you.

I only have two ears, how can sound be 3D?

Close your eyes and listen to your ears only. You will realise that you can immediately tell from where a sound is coming from. The sound travels from the source to our ears and until it finally hits our ear drums several things happen. The first effect is most obvious. The speed of sound is limited and e.g. sound coming from your left side will arrive at your left ear earlier than on your right ear. Secondly, the sound on your right ear will be attenuated due to the head shadowing effect. Furthermore, there are more sound paths that hit your torso first and are then delayed and reflected to your ears. Additionally, all these effects are strongly frequency dependent. Your ears are used to these kind of “artifacts” and decode them as spatial information.

KLANG’s 3D in-ear mixing technology imitates exactly what would happen to e.g. instrument signals around you before it hits your ear drums. A specially processed signal arrives at your in-ear or headphones drivers and contains all spatial cues your ears need to get a full 3D impression to let you immerse into a realistic and transparent sound field.

Isn’t the motion tracking confusion when playing live music?

No, it isn’t. Let’s look how we perceive sounds from origins around you for a moment. The human hearing is very versatile and allows accurate location of sound. When we turn (or rotate in any of the 3 rotational axis – roll, pitch, yaw) our head the sound changes immediately. This feels natural and the movement even increases the localization accuracy of our hearing. Static sound on headphones is often claimed to be unnatural. Our motion tracking is so fast (low latency) and precise so that it feels as if you were moving your head in a real – and not virtual – acoustic scene. The motion tracking let’s all instruments stay at fixed positions on stage. Especially when the visual and the auditory sensation occur at the same place it feels very immersive and the sound is perceived as very pleasing, natural and very transparent, since our head and ears can distinguish all sound sources easily. KLANG:vektor brings you to the next level of sound transparency and realism.

Why is the KLANG sound so much more transparent?

Our hearing always relies on spatial cues and is trained to listen to different directions. Once we concentrate to listen to sound coming from a specific location (hitting our ears from a certain angle) the other sounds from other directions are blended out immediatly. With KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier this spatial cues are delivered through your in-ears and headphones and your ears can work in the same way they are used to do. This feels very natural and is not tiring for your ears. That is the reason why many musicians still feel relaxed when playing live or in the studio through KLANG’s 3D mixing.

Without KLANG? If your ears don’t find these spatial cues in your sound mix, you have to concentrate on specific timbres or sounds of instruments. What happens then, you have to think e.g. how a violin sounds like and then find the violin like sound character in a one-dimensional sound mix. This is a very challenging task for your ears and your brain. No matter how experienced you are with this, 3D in-ear mixing relieves your ears.

Will the sound get louder if I move towards an instrument?

No. KLANG relies on orientation data instead of position data. Once you have the monitor mix you want to work with, you don’t wont the balance of the mix to change. Imagine you walk towards the drum set, then it should not get louder. That is why we leave out the position data and use only the orientation data. Orientation does not change the balance of your mix it just add so much transparency and realism as the mix follows your head rotation as you would expect it without headphones or in-ears.

Connectivity

Can I remote control the system via MIDI or OSC?

Yes, that is possible. KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier are remote controlled by KLANG:app via OpenSoundControl (OSC) messages. There are flexible converters from OSC to OSC or MIDI to OSC available, such as OSCulator. In this way, mixing console commands like snapshot recall or fader comnands can be converted.

Additionally, tools like touchOSC can be used to design specific graphic interfaces if required.

Find details in the OSC Reference Guide and the OSC MIDI Remote Control article.

Can I use a different word clock source for the Dante network?

Yes. Dante has the great advantage that it takes care about clocking almost automatically. If you use KLANG:vier with an ADAT input or KLANG:fabrik with ADAT or MADI or external Wordclock and you want to integrate the KLANG devices to a Dante network the clock has to be configured manually.

Set the KLANG devices to the clock source of your choice. In Dante Controller tweak the clock settings of the KLANG device in the “Clock Status” tab. Enable the “sync to external” and “preferred master” for this unit. Now, the internal clock of the KLANG device will feed the entire Dante network and you can route audio from KLANG:vier/KLANG:fabrik  e.g. to a KLANG:quelle.

Make sure that KLANG:vier and KLANG:fabrik are not set back to Dante as the clock master in KLANG:app before unchecking the “sync to external” setting again. Otherwise, you will end up with the clock loop.

 

Do I need an additional digital mixing console?

Short answer: yes. KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier do not offer equalising or dynamics such as compressors or limiters. We rely on your digitial mixing console, either the front of house desk or a dedicated monitor console to send pre-processed instrument or microphone signals. The spatial processing and the binaural mixdown happens in our 3D in-ear mixing systems. However, it is possible to connect an analog to digital converter (DAC) directly to our system and use the height setting (tap orbit twice, elevation) as a smart EQ filter.

What is Dante?

Dante is a proprietary audio over IP (AoIP) network protocol developed by the company Audinate. It is extremely versatile, robust due to redundancy features and still easy to use. Instead of analog multicores and several digital interface cables with Dante hundreds of channels of audio with high fidelity sound (24 or 32 bit, 44.1–192kHz) can be transmitted over hundreds of meters with only one network cable and maybe a second one for seamless redundancy.

Most manufacturers in the field of digital mixing consoles have already incorporated Dante into their products e.g. by supplying expansion cards. Among them Yamaha, DiGiCo, Soundcraft, SSL, PreSonus, Midas through Klarkteknik converter, Behringer and many many more. Converters between digital formats or to analog inputs and outputs are available in various configurations. DAD/NTP, Focusrite, Auvitran are just a few offering great connectivity possibilities.

Since 2015, Audinate’s Dante modules can be firmware updated to offer AES67 support enabling network audio connectivity to an ever wider range of products.

What mixing consoles can be connected to KLANG:fabrik/KLANG:vier?

Any digital mixing console with either ADAT / optical outputs or the Dante AoIP protocol or AES67 support. A MADI expansion for KLANG:fabrik is under development. All other digital and all analog mixing consoles can be connected with their analog outputs going through an analog to digital converter (ADC) with either ADAT or Dante.

What Samplingrates are supported?

KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier can work with 44.1 and 48kHz. Especially double and quad speed sampling rates are not supported at this point. There will most likely be a firmware update enabling a sample rate conversion especially for the Dante inputs and outputs.

Dante

Can I use a different word clock source for the Dante network?

Yes. Dante has the great advantage that it takes care about clocking almost automatically. If you use KLANG:vier with an ADAT input or KLANG:fabrik with ADAT or MADI or external Wordclock and you want to integrate the KLANG devices to a Dante network the clock has to be configured manually.

Set the KLANG devices to the clock source of your choice. In Dante Controller tweak the clock settings of the KLANG device in the “Clock Status” tab. Enable the “sync to external” and “preferred master” for this unit. Now, the internal clock of the KLANG device will feed the entire Dante network and you can route audio from KLANG:vier/KLANG:fabrik  e.g. to a KLANG:quelle.

Make sure that KLANG:vier and KLANG:fabrik are not set back to Dante as the clock master in KLANG:app before unchecking the “sync to external” setting again. Otherwise, you will end up with the clock loop.

 

General

Do I need special headphones or in-ears to experience 3D sound?

No. KLANG incorporates binaural technology and processes the sound inside KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier to work immediately with your own pair of standard stereo headphones or in-ears. In fact, it is not important if your headphones are open or closed, electrostatic, dynamic or use balanced armature drivers as most in-ears do. You can use universal fit in-ears or custom molded in-ears. Just make sure that the polarity is correct and the left and right signals go to the correct ears.

How can I connect the position data of the other musicians?

If you want your mix to follow with the movement of musicians, please talk to us. There are position tracking systems for on-stage use available as e.g. from TiMax. These system allow to send out their position data and KLANG can also deal with these positions. However, this is not the normal use case and we will help you to figure out the best configuration for you.

I only have two ears, how can sound be 3D?

Close your eyes and listen to your ears only. You will realise that you can immediately tell from where a sound is coming from. The sound travels from the source to our ears and until it finally hits our ear drums several things happen. The first effect is most obvious. The speed of sound is limited and e.g. sound coming from your left side will arrive at your left ear earlier than on your right ear. Secondly, the sound on your right ear will be attenuated due to the head shadowing effect. Furthermore, there are more sound paths that hit your torso first and are then delayed and reflected to your ears. Additionally, all these effects are strongly frequency dependent. Your ears are used to these kind of “artifacts” and decode them as spatial information.

KLANG’s 3D in-ear mixing technology imitates exactly what would happen to e.g. instrument signals around you before it hits your ear drums. A specially processed signal arrives at your in-ear or headphones drivers and contains all spatial cues your ears need to get a full 3D impression to let you immerse into a realistic and transparent sound field.

KLANG:app

Can I remote control the system via MIDI or OSC?

Yes, that is possible. KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier are remote controlled by KLANG:app via OpenSoundControl (OSC) messages. There are flexible converters from OSC to OSC or MIDI to OSC available, such as OSCulator. In this way, mixing console commands like snapshot recall or fader comnands can be converted.

Additionally, tools like touchOSC can be used to design specific graphic interfaces if required.

Find details in the OSC Reference Guide and the OSC MIDI Remote Control article.

Does KLANG:app support multi-touch?

On iOS and Android multi-touch is inherently supported. On Windows KLANG:app can be used with a multi-touch display, i.e. several faders and icons can be moved in parallel. However, on Mac OS X multi-touch displays are not supported as such. Hence, only a single fader or a single icon can be moved one after another.

– We are currently working on a solution for this and work around the barriers of Mac OS X –

I can’t see any devices in the KLANG:app (Windows)

KLANG:app and KLANG:fabrik / KLANG:vier communicate over IP broadcast messages. In some cases, Windows prevents broadcast messages to be sent to all existing network adapters, so the handshake with KLANG:app cannot be completed successfully. Workaround: Try to deactivate unused adapters like VMware or VirtualBox virtual adapters.

My KLANG:app connect screen is flickering. Why?

Especially, when several tablets or smartphones should be identically configured for the use with a KLANG system, the easiest solution is to restore these devices from a backup of an ideally configured device. However, KLANG:app uses a Universal ID to be recognized by the KLANG system. This ID – especially for iOS devices – cannot technically be generated by universal identifiers and hence a random number is used. The backup stores this ID and uses it for all restored devices. Hence, all KLANG:apps have the ID and the system cannot distinguish between the remote control devices anymore.

Solution: De-install KLANG:app and install again. When started for the first time a random ID will be generated and stored.

In the next KLANG:app/KOS release this behaviour will be automatically recognized and the IDs will be renewed automatically.

KLANG:fabrik

Can I use a different word clock source for the Dante network?

Yes. Dante has the great advantage that it takes care about clocking almost automatically. If you use KLANG:vier with an ADAT input or KLANG:fabrik with ADAT or MADI or external Wordclock and you want to integrate the KLANG devices to a Dante network the clock has to be configured manually.

Set the KLANG devices to the clock source of your choice. In Dante Controller tweak the clock settings of the KLANG device in the “Clock Status” tab. Enable the “sync to external” and “preferred master” for this unit. Now, the internal clock of the KLANG device will feed the entire Dante network and you can route audio from KLANG:vier/KLANG:fabrik  e.g. to a KLANG:quelle.

Make sure that KLANG:vier and KLANG:fabrik are not set back to Dante as the clock master in KLANG:app before unchecking the “sync to external” setting again. Otherwise, you will end up with the clock loop.

 

Do I need an iPad, Tablet or Smartphone?

Short answer, YES. If you want to use KLANG:fabrik or KLANG:vier as a personal monitoring system each musician should have access to a remote control device running KLANG:app. In this way each musician can mix independently and adapt the mix quickly during a gig. If you are touring with a dedicated monitor engineer, leave the control to your engineer. While mobile devices are very convinient as you can move around freely on stage and mix from everywhere, monitor engineer will also prefer to run a second KLANG:app on a Windows laptop or Mac Book with hardwired network access. This is in terms of redundancy e.g. if there is a rare problem with the WiFi network.

Is it Personal Monitoring System or is it a tool for Monitor Engineers?

Both.

KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier are both designed to be very easy to use especially if you don’t have years of experience in mixing monitors. The 3D in-ear mixing functionality enables musicians to get a very transparent and natural in-ear / headphone mix and a very short time.

At the same time, our products and especially KLANG:app offers all features experienced sound engineers or monitor engineers expect when working with a mixing tool for the live or studio market. Especially features like CUE mixing for musicians is a feature you want to use at mixing monitors constantly.

What mixing consoles can be connected to KLANG:fabrik/KLANG:vier?

Any digital mixing console with either ADAT / optical outputs or the Dante AoIP protocol or AES67 support. A MADI expansion for KLANG:fabrik is under development. All other digital and all analog mixing consoles can be connected with their analog outputs going through an analog to digital converter (ADC) with either ADAT or Dante.

What Samplingrates are supported?

KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier can work with 44.1 and 48kHz. Especially double and quad speed sampling rates are not supported at this point. There will most likely be a firmware update enabling a sample rate conversion especially for the Dante inputs and outputs.

KLANG:system

Question about KLANG:fabrik, KLANG:vier, KLANG:quelle and other products.

I can’t see any devices in the KLANG:app (Windows)

KLANG:app and KLANG:fabrik / KLANG:vier communicate over IP broadcast messages. In some cases, Windows prevents broadcast messages to be sent to all existing network adapters, so the handshake with KLANG:app cannot be completed successfully. Workaround: Try to deactivate unused adapters like VMware or VirtualBox virtual adapters.

KLANG:vektor

How can I attach KLANG:vektor to my in-ears?

Once KLANG:vektor is officially released and shipping, two different versions will be available. The first version contains a motion sensor cable. This can be attached by small flexible rubber clamp rings to a thicker head phone cable or be softly glued to e.g. your over the ear headphones or universal fit in-ears with non-detachable in-ear cables. The second version is for the use with 2-pin connector enabled in-ears (mainly custom molded ones) such as Ultimate Ears, Rhines Customs, Vision Ears, Variphone, Westone (special 2-pin versions), Clear Tune Monitors – just to name a few brands. If you are unsure please leave us a message with your exact model and type and we get back to you with an answer as soon as possible. This cable replaces the cable your in-ears were supplied with. Hence, audio and sensor data run through the same cable making it very comfortable.

KLANG:vier

Can I use a different word clock source for the Dante network?

Yes. Dante has the great advantage that it takes care about clocking almost automatically. If you use KLANG:vier with an ADAT input or KLANG:fabrik with ADAT or MADI or external Wordclock and you want to integrate the KLANG devices to a Dante network the clock has to be configured manually.

Set the KLANG devices to the clock source of your choice. In Dante Controller tweak the clock settings of the KLANG device in the “Clock Status” tab. Enable the “sync to external” and “preferred master” for this unit. Now, the internal clock of the KLANG device will feed the entire Dante network and you can route audio from KLANG:vier/KLANG:fabrik  e.g. to a KLANG:quelle.

Make sure that KLANG:vier and KLANG:fabrik are not set back to Dante as the clock master in KLANG:app before unchecking the “sync to external” setting again. Otherwise, you will end up with the clock loop.

 

Do I need an iPad, Tablet or Smartphone?

Short answer, YES. If you want to use KLANG:fabrik or KLANG:vier as a personal monitoring system each musician should have access to a remote control device running KLANG:app. In this way each musician can mix independently and adapt the mix quickly during a gig. If you are touring with a dedicated monitor engineer, leave the control to your engineer. While mobile devices are very convinient as you can move around freely on stage and mix from everywhere, monitor engineer will also prefer to run a second KLANG:app on a Windows laptop or Mac Book with hardwired network access. This is in terms of redundancy e.g. if there is a rare problem with the WiFi network.

I can’t see any devices in the KLANG:app (Windows)

KLANG:app and KLANG:fabrik / KLANG:vier communicate over IP broadcast messages. In some cases, Windows prevents broadcast messages to be sent to all existing network adapters, so the handshake with KLANG:app cannot be completed successfully. Workaround: Try to deactivate unused adapters like VMware or VirtualBox virtual adapters.

Is it Personal Monitoring System or is it a tool for Monitor Engineers?

Both.

KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier are both designed to be very easy to use especially if you don’t have years of experience in mixing monitors. The 3D in-ear mixing functionality enables musicians to get a very transparent and natural in-ear / headphone mix and a very short time.

At the same time, our products and especially KLANG:app offers all features experienced sound engineers or monitor engineers expect when working with a mixing tool for the live or studio market. Especially features like CUE mixing for musicians is a feature you want to use at mixing monitors constantly.

What mixing consoles can be connected to KLANG:fabrik/KLANG:vier?

Any digital mixing console with either ADAT / optical outputs or the Dante AoIP protocol or AES67 support. A MADI expansion for KLANG:fabrik is under development. All other digital and all analog mixing consoles can be connected with their analog outputs going through an analog to digital converter (ADC) with either ADAT or Dante.

What Samplingrates are supported?

KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier can work with 44.1 and 48kHz. Especially double and quad speed sampling rates are not supported at this point. There will most likely be a firmware update enabling a sample rate conversion especially for the Dante inputs and outputs.

Mixing Desk Connection

Questions on how to connect KLANG:system to your mixing desk.

Can I remote control the system via MIDI or OSC?

Yes, that is possible. KLANG:fabrik and KLANG:vier are remote controlled by KLANG:app via OpenSoundControl (OSC) messages. There are flexible converters from OSC to OSC or MIDI to OSC available, such as OSCulator. In this way, mixing console commands like snapshot recall or fader comnands can be converted.

Additionally, tools like touchOSC can be used to design specific graphic interfaces if required.

Find details in the OSC Reference Guide and the OSC MIDI Remote Control article.

Can I use a different word clock source for the Dante network?

Yes. Dante has the great advantage that it takes care about clocking almost automatically. If you use KLANG:vier with an ADAT input or KLANG:fabrik with ADAT or MADI or external Wordclock and you want to integrate the KLANG devices to a Dante network the clock has to be configured manually.

Set the KLANG devices to the clock source of your choice. In Dante Controller tweak the clock settings of the KLANG device in the “Clock Status” tab. Enable the “sync to external” and “preferred master” for this unit. Now, the internal clock of the KLANG device will feed the entire Dante network and you can route audio from KLANG:vier/KLANG:fabrik  e.g. to a KLANG:quelle.

Make sure that KLANG:vier and KLANG:fabrik are not set back to Dante as the clock master in KLANG:app before unchecking the “sync to external” setting again. Otherwise, you will end up with the clock loop.

 

Motion Tracking

How can I attach KLANG:vektor to my in-ears?

Once KLANG:vektor is officially released and shipping, two different versions will be available. The first version contains a motion sensor cable. This can be attached by small flexible rubber clamp rings to a thicker head phone cable or be softly glued to e.g. your over the ear headphones or universal fit in-ears with non-detachable in-ear cables. The second version is for the use with 2-pin connector enabled in-ears (mainly custom molded ones) such as Ultimate Ears, Rhines Customs, Vision Ears, Variphone, Westone (special 2-pin versions), Clear Tune Monitors – just to name a few brands. If you are unsure please leave us a message with your exact model and type and we get back to you with an answer as soon as possible. This cable replaces the cable your in-ears were supplied with. Hence, audio and sensor data run through the same cable making it very comfortable.